Fluorescent proteins designed from scratch

In the summer of 1961, Osamu Shimomura drove across the country in a cramped station wagon to scoop jellyfish from the docks of Friday Harbor. He wanted to discover what made them glow. It took Shimomura and other biochemists more 30 years to find a full answer. By then, recombinant DNA technology allowed researchers to …

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New CPUs = new proteins

Modeling even the smallest protein requires a big computer. That’s why we are expanding and modernizing our in-house computing resources. Recently, Luki Goldschmidt, Senior Manager of Computing, and Patrick Vecchiato, our Computer Support Analyst, upgraded our local high-performance cluster known as DIGs. We use DIGs to develop new computational methods and protocols. While a typical …

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David selected for 2018 Hans Neurath Award

The Protein Society has selected David Baker as this year’s Hans Neurath Award winner. The award recognizes “a recent contribution of unusual merit to basic protein science.” The Society writes that David’s breakthroughs “reduce to practice what was for many decades the holy grail of protein science: fundamental understanding of the determinants of protein structure …

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End-of-year profile in The New York Times

At the end of a historic year for protein design, the Baker lab was honored to be profiled in the New York Times by famed science writer Carl Zimmer. Zimmer writes about the technology, progress and promise in the field, noting the contributions from our wonderful crowdsource participants. On the technology front, Rosetta continues to …

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Thanks Chemical & Engineering News!

The lab was honored to be featured in Chemical & Engineering News’ annual Research of the Year roundup. Under a section titled “Computer-Driven Research Researched New Milestones”, C&EN highlight our determination of “600 families of proteins for which structures had been unknown (Science 2017).” Chemical & Engineering News is a weekly magazine published by the …

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New article in Nature: Synthetic nucleocapsids

A report this week describes the first synthetic protein assemblies — dubbed synthetic nucleocapsids — that encapsulate their own genome and evolve in complex environments. The lead authors were Gabe Butterfield and Marc Lajoie. Synthetic nucleocapsids are built to resemble viral capsids and could be used in future to deliver therapeutics to specific cells and …

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New article in Science: Exploring the peptide landscape

IPD researchers report the computational design of a new world of small cyclic peptides, or “macrocycles”. Natural macrocycles such as cyclosporine are among the most potent therapeutics identified to date, having the benefits of small molecule drugs, like aspirin, and large antibody therapies, like rituximab, with fewer drawbacks. There is considerable interest in expanding this …

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